Kilimanjaro Climbing Routes

Kilimanjaro Routes | Routes to the Roof of Africa

There are six established routes to climb Mount Kilimanjaro – Marangu, Machame, Lemosho, Shira, Rongai and Umbwe. The Marangu, Machame, and Umbwe routes all approach from the south of the mountain (Mweka is used only for descent). The Lemosho and Shira routes approach from the west. The Rongai route approaches from the north.

Marangu (“Coca Cola”) Route

Known as the “Coca-Cola” route, the Marangu route is a classic trek on Mount Kilimanjaro. It is the oldest, most well-established route. Many favor the Marangu route because it is considered to be the easiest path on the mountain, given its gradual slope. It is also the only route which offers sleeping huts in dormitory-style accommodations.

The minimum days required for this route is five, although the probability of successfully reaching the top in that time period is quite low. Spending an extra acclimatization day on the mountain is highly recommended when climbing Kilimanjaro using the Marangu route.

However, despite its immense popularity, we avoid leading climbs on the Marangu route. The route has the least scenic variety of all the routes because the ascent and descent are done on the same path and it is the most crowded route for that reason. Marangu is favored only during the rainy season, where the hut accommodations are preferred over wet ground, or for those who only have five days to climb Kilimanjaro (which we do not recommend anyhow). Otherwise, the Marangu route is a poor choice.

 

Machame (“Whiskey”) Route

Known as the “Whiskey” route, the Machame route is now the most popular route on the mountain. Compared with Marangu, the days on Machame are longer and the walks are steeper. The Machame route is considered a difficult route, and is better suited for more adventurous folks and those with some hiking or backpacking experience.

The minimum number of days required for this route is six days, although seven days is recommended as one can get chance to acclimatize.

The Machame route is scenically beautiful and varied.

 

Lemosho Route

The Lemosho route is one of the newer routes on Mount Kilimanjaro. The route begins in the west and rather than simply intersecting Shira Plateau (like Machame), Lemosho crosses it from Shira Ridge to Shira Camp. Climbers encounter low traffic until the route joins the Machame route. Afterwards, Lemosho follows the same route through Lava Tower, Barranco and Barafu, known as the southern circuit.The minimum number of days required for this route is six days, although eight days is ideal.Lemosho is considered the most beautiful route on Kilimanjaro and grants panoramic vistas on various sides of the mountain. It is our favorite route because it offers a great balance of low traffic, scenic views and a high summit success rate. Thus, Lemosho comes highly recommended.

Shira Route

The Shira route is another path that approaches Kilimanjaro from the west, and it is nearly identical to the Lemosho route. In fact, Shira was the original route and Lemosho is the improved variation. While Lemosho starts at Londorossi Gate and treks through the rain forest to Shira 1 Camp, the Shira route bypasses this walk by using a vehicle to transport climbers to Shira Gate, located near the Shira Ridge.

On the first day on the mountain, climbers begin their hike from 11,800 feet (3,600 m) and spend their first night at the same elevation at Simba Camp. Then, the route merges with Lemosho and follows the southern circuit route. Although Shira is a varied and beautiful route, Lemosho is recommended over Shira due to the high altitude of Shira’s starting point. It is possible that climbers will experience altitude related symptoms on the first day due to failed acclimatization. Climbers using Shira should be confident of their ability to acclimatize.

 

 

Rongai Route

The Rongai route is the only route that approaches Kilimanjaro from the north, close to the Kenyan border. Though gaining popularity amongst climbers, Rongai has low traffic. It is the preferred route for those looking for an alternative to the crowded Marangu route, for those who would like a more remote hike, and for those who are climbing during the rainy season (the north side receives less precipitation). The minimum number of days required for this route is six days, and seven days are recommended.

Although the scenery is not as varied as the western routes, Rongai makes up for this by passing through true wilderness areas for days before joining the Marangu route at Kibo camp. This route descends down the Marangu route. Rongai is a moderately difficult route, and is highly recommended, especially for those with less backpacking experience.

 

Umbwe Route

 

The Umbwe Route is widely regarded as the hardest trail, a tough vertical slog through the jungle, in places using the tree roots as makeshift rungs on a ladder. Having reached the Southern Circular Route, trekkers can continue north-west to tackle Kibo from the west and the difficult Arrow Glacier Route; or you can follow the Southern Circular Route east round to Barafu and approach the summit from there. The entire walk up and down takes a minimum of five days if going via the Barafu Campsite (though this is entirely too rapid; take six minimum, with a day at Karanga Valley); or five minimum (six is again better) if going via the Western Breach/Arrow Glacier, with more days if sleeping in the crater.

 

Mweka Route

This, the shortest route from a road-head to the summit is now only used in descent. The upper section to the summit is called the Barafu (Swahili – ice) Route. It is normally descended having approached the mountain by the Lemosho, Machame, Umbwe or Shira Routes. These routes are linked to the Barafu-Mweka Route by the high-level traverse beneath the Southern Icefields, the Kibo South Circuit. This traverse is one of the more scenic walks on Kilimanjaro.

 

What gear you need to bring:

You are responsible for bringing personal gear and equipment while communal equipment (tents, food, cooking items, etc.) is provided. Below is a gear list of required, recommended and optional items to bring on your climb.

Technical Clothing

1 – Waterproof Jacket, breathable with hood

1 – Insulated Jacket, synthetic or down

1 – Soft Jacket, fleece or soft-shell

2 – Long Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric

1 – Short Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric

1 – Waterproof Pants, breathable (side-zipper recommended)

2 – Hiking Pants (convertible to shorts recommended)

1 – Fleece Pants

1 – Shorts (optional)

1 – Long Underwear (moisture-wicking fabric recommended)

3 – Underwear, briefs (moisture-wicking fabric recommended)

2 – Sports Bra (women)

Headwear

1 – Brimmed Hat, for sun protection

1 – Knit Hat, for warmth

1 – Balaclava, for face coverage (optional)

1 – Bandana (optional)

Handwear

1 – Gloves, warm (waterproof recommended)

1 – Glove Liners, thin, synthetic, worn under gloves for added warmth (optional)

Footwear

1 – Hiking Boots, warm, waterproof, broken-in, with spare laces

1 – Gym Shoes, to wear at camp (optional)

3 – Socks, thick, wool or synthetic

3 – Sock Liners, tight, thin, synthetic, worn under socks to prevent blisters (optional)

1 – Gaiters, waterproof (optional)

Accessories

1 – Sunglasses or Goggles

1 – Backpack Cover, waterproof (optional)

1 – Poncho, during the rainy season (optional)

1 – Water Bottle (Nalgene, 32 oz. recommended) (To be provided)

1 – Water Bladder, Camelback type (recommended)

1 – Towel, lightweight, quick-dry (optional)

Stuff Sacks or Plastic Bags, various sizes, to keep gear dry and separate

Equipment

1 – Sleeping Bag, warm, four seasons

1 – Sleeping Bag Liner, for added warmth (optional)

1 – Trekking Poles (recommended) (to be provided)

1 – Headlamp, with extra batteries

1 – Duffel bag, (waterproof recommended) for porters to carry your equipment (To be provided)

1 – Daypack, for you to carry your personal gear

Other

Toiletries

Prescriptions

Sunscreen

Lip Balm

Insect Repellent, containing DEET

First Aid Kit

Hand Sanitizer

Toilet Paper (To be provided)

Wet Wipes (recommended)

Snacks, light-weight, high calorie, high energy (optional)

Pencil and Notebook, miniature, for trip log (optional)

Camera, with extra batteries (optional)

Paperwork

Trip Receipt

Passport

Visa (available at JRO for $100)

Immunization Papers

 

NB: Please note, all the gears to wear are available for hiring in Moshi for the whole trip. If you decide to hire your personal equipment, you will spend about $130 to $250 only.

 

 7 DAYS KILIMANJARO-RONGAI ROUTE ITINERARY

The Rongai Route is the only route that approaches Kilimanjaro from the north, near the Kenyan border. Rongai’s ascent profile is very similar to that of Marangu. It is one of Kilimanjaro’s easier routes. The climb to the top is gradual and steady. However, unlike Marangu, this route has low crowds and passes through remote wilderness areas. It is probably the only route where seeing wildlife in the first days is possible.

Day One:

Rongai Gate (1,800m/5,900ft) to First Cave Camp (2,600m/8,400ft)

Elevation Gain: 760 meters, 2,000 feet

After an early breakfast in Moshi, drive to the Rongai Gate near the Kenya border. After registering at the gate, begin your climb to Uhuru Peak, the roof of Africa. During the first day, hike through forests where you may see and hear wildlife. Eat lunch on the trail before continuing to the first campsite. Rongai ascends via the less forested northern side of the mountain.

Rongai Route is one of the least crowded routes on Kilimanjaro because of the long drive to the gate. The Rongai trail is thought to have the best chance of viewing wildlife.

Day Two:

Second Cave Camp (2,600m/8,400ft) to Kikelewa Camp (3,600m/11,810ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,000 meters, 3,280 feet

During day two hike through Kilimanjaro’s moorland. The Rongai route is relatively short and steep, making for shorter hiking times. During this day, view Mawenzi Peak ahead.

Day Three:

Kikelewa Camp (3,600m/11,810ft) to Mawenzi Tarn Camp (4,330m/14,200ft)

Elevation Gain: 730 meters, 2,390 feet

This day is an acclimatization day, allowing you to hike at the beginning of the day and rest in the afternoon and evening. The hike is relatively short but steep. The Mawenzi Tarn campsite is situated below Mawenzi Peak and offers stunning views of both Mawenzi and Kibo.

 

Day Four:

Mawenzi Tarn Camp (4,330m/14,200ft)

Day four is an acclimatization day at Mawenzi Tarn. We advise hiking a bit higher this day before returning to Mawenzi Tarn in the afternoon.

Day Five:

Mawenzi Tarn Camp (4,330m/14,200ft) to Kibo Camp (4,750m/15,580ft)

Elevation Gain: 420 meters/1380 feet

Cross the lunar landscape of the saddle on this day to arrive at the final campsite. Kibo Camp is situated directly below the Kibo cone, giving you views of your final destination.

 Day Six:

Kibo Camp (4,750m/15,580ft) to Uhuru Peak (5,895m/19,340ft) to Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,145 meters, 3,760 feet

Elevation Loss: 2,175 meters, 7,140 feet

Around midnight, begin the final ascent to Uhuru Peak, the highest point in Africa. For the next six hours, hike by the light of your flashlight. The ascent to the crater rim is the most challenging part of the entire trek. The trail is very steep until you reach the crater rim at Gilman’s Point.

The hike from Gilman’s to Uhuru Peak is a gradual climb and, as far as hikes go, not very difficult. The altitude, however, makes the hike long and tiring. The crater rim hike takes approximately two hours. Upon reaching Uhuru, take photos of your guide and group at the peak before beginning the descent to Horombo Hut.

 

Day Seven:

Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft) to Marangu Gate (1,800m/5,905ft)

Elevation Loss: 1,920 meters, 6,295 feet

After breakfast, finish the trek with a descent to Marangu Gate. Your last hike on Kilimanjaro is a beautiful one, passing through Kilimanjaro’s cloud forest. Watch your step during the descent, as the trail can be slippery.

Our vehicles will be waiting at Marangu Gate to take you back to Moshi/Arusha 

 

6 DAYS KILIMANJARO-MARANGU ROUTE

ITINERARY

The Marangu Route is also known as the “Coca Cola” or “tourist” route. It is the easiest and shortest route to the summit. This is also the only route offers accommodation in huts at every point you spend your night with solar lights and comfortable beds. Bathrooms and running water are available at the two lower

Day One:

Marangu Gate (1,800m/5,905ft) to Mandara Hut (2,743m/9,000ft)

Elevation Gain: 915 meters, 3,000 feet.

Leave Moshi at 8 am for Marangu Gate. After completing gate registration, begin your Kilimanjaro trek. Walk along a narrow trail through the rainforest of Kilimanjaro for most of the hike. Eat a picnic lunch at Kisambioni, day one’s halfway point. After lunch continues walking through the rainforest until reaching Mandara Hut. Relax for the rest of the day or take a short walk to Maundi Crater. The views to the east over Taveta and to the northwest to Mawenzi Peak are stunning on a clear day, making the short hike well worth the effort.

The A-frame Mandara Huts can accommodate up to seventy people and consist of several sleeping huts and a dining area. All of Marangu’s huts have beds with mattresses.

Day Two:

Mandara Hut (2,743m/9,000ft) to Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft)

Elevation Gain: 977 meters, 3,200 feet

After breakfast, leave Mandara Hut and Kilimanjaro’s forests for Horombo Hut. Most of the day’s hike will be through Kilimanjaro’s moorland, a rocky landscape with desert-like plants. Eat a picnic lunch at KambiyaTaabu before continuing to Horombo Hut. If the weather is clear, enjoy beautiful views of Mawenzi and Kibo peaks. Arrive at Horombo Hut at around 3 pm and spend the rest of the afternoon relaxing.

Although extremely busy, the Horombo Huts are considered to be the nicest on Kilimanjaro. The small, A-frame buildings can accommodate up to eight people each and provide lodging for hikers ascending, descending and acclimatizing. Horombo can accommodate up to one hundred hikers and many more porters, cooks and guides.

Day Three:

Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft) to Mawenzi Hut (4,600m/15,100ft) to Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft)

Elevation Gain and Loss: 880 meters, 2,900 feet

Day three is an acclimatization day. We suggest hiking all the way to Mawenzi Hut to allow for maximum acclimatization. The hike will increase your chances of reaching Uhuru Peak, and also reward you with magnificent views of Kibo. Return to Horombo for a late lunch. Spend the afternoon and evening relaxing at Horombo.

Day Four:

Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft) to Kibo Hut (4,750m/15,580ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,030 meters, 3,380 feet

Leave Horombo Hut after breakfast to hike through the moorland and alpine desert of Kilimanjaro’s upper altitudes. After hiking for about an hour arrive at Maua River, a small mountain stream. After Maua, the terrain becomes flatter and the vegetation begins to disappear. Break for lunch at Middle Red Hill. After lunch, continue on a steady incline for another two hours through Kilimanjaro’s Saddle. Although the environment on the way to Kibo is a bleak desert with little vegetation, you will see many stunning views of Kibo and Mawenzi peaks. Reach Kibo Hut around 3 pm to rest and prepare for your midnight climb.

Day Five:

Kibo Hut (4,750m/15,580ft) to Summit (5,895m/19,340ft) to Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,145 meters, 3,760 feet

Elevation Loss: 2,175 meters, 7,140 feet

Around midnight, awake for the final ascent to Uhuru Peak, the roof of Africa. The hike begins with a demanding five-hour hike to Gillman’s Point on the crater rim. Although this is considered to be the easiest of the three crater ascent paths, it is still extremely difficult. The first major rest stop, William’s Point, lies at 5000 meters and is approximately a two-hour hike Kibo Hut. Continue on for thirty minutes before beginning the rocky switchbacks that will continue to Gillman’s Point (5,681 meters).

The hike from Gilman’s to Uhuru Peak is a gradual climb and as far as hikes go, not very difficult. The altitude, however, makes the hike long and tiring. The crater rim hike takes approximately two hours. Upon reaching Uhuru, take photos of your guide and group at the peak before beginning the descent to Horombo Hut.

On the way down from the summit, you will see all of the magnificent views you could not see on the way up. Stop for a short break and snacks at Kibo Hut before continuing on to Horombo Hut. Reach Horombo Hut in the afternoon and enjoy your last night on the mountain.

 

Day Six:

Horombo Hut (3,720m/12,200ft) to Marangu Gate (1,800m/5,905ft)

Elevation Loss: 1,920 meters, 6,295 feet

After breakfast, finish the trek with a descent to Marangu Gate. Your last hike on Kilimanjaro is a beautiful one, passing through Kilimanjaro’s cloud forest. Watch your step during the descent, as the trail can be slippery.

Our vehicles will be waiting at Marangu Gate to take you back to Moshi for Hot shower and Champagne/Kilimanjaro Beer Celebrations.

End of your Kilimanjaro Mountain Trekking Via Marangu Route

 

7 DAYS KILIMANJARO-MACHAME ROUTE (camping Route)

 

ITINERARY

Day 0:

Meeting and greetings at the airport drive to the hotel for the stay before the climb, at the hotel you can meet a guide for briefing depending the time you arrived.

Day One:      

Machame Gate (1,800m/5,905ft) to Machame Camp (3,000m/9,840ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,200 meters, 3,935 feet

Distance: 9 kilometres

At 9 am, leave a hotel from Moshi for Machame Gate, where you will meet the porters and cooks that will spend the next seven days trekking with you to Uhuru Peak, the roof of Africa. Once you arrive, you will have a chance to register in a visitor’s book at the gate while the staff, the porters and guides make final preparations on weighing their luggage and make all the payments needed to enter the park.

Your first day’s destination is Machame Camp. Each day, porters and cooks will walk ahead to set up the camp in time for your arrival. On the first day, hike through the moss-covered trees of Kilimanjaro’s cloud forest. The forest will thin at the end of the hike and vegetation will change to include heathers, tall grasses and wildflowers. If the weather is clear, view the surrounding area and your ultimate destination, Kibo Peak.

Day Two:

Machame Camp (3,000m/9,840ft) to Shira Camp (3,840m/12,600ft)

Elevation Gain: 840 meters, 2,760 feet

Distance: 7 kilometres

Although considered to be the easiest day on the Machame Route, today’s trek includes several uphill sections. Carry plenty of drinking water, as the exposed hike can be hot on a clear day. There are several viewpoints from which you can see the plains and forests below and Kibo and Mawenzi peaks above.

As you gain altitude, notice the change in vegetation. The trees diminish in size, giving way to Kilimanjaro’s famous high altitude plants, Senecio Kilimanjaro and Lobelia deckenii. After eating lunch, climb the Shira Plateau, created when Kibo’s lava flows filled the Shira crater. Continue to Shira Camp, where you will relax for the rest of the day. Kibo lies to the west and Mount Meru to the east.

 

Day Three:

Shira Camp (3,840m/12,600ft) to Barranco Camp (3,950m/12,960ft)

Total Elevation Gain: 690 meters, 2,264 feet Distance: 10 kilometers

Although this up and down day ends with an elevation gain of only 110 meters, by early afternoon you will have climbed 690 meters to a height of 4,530 meters before beginning your descent to Barranco Camp. This day is crucial for acclimatization.

After breakfast, hike east on the Shira Plateau before reaching the junction for the Shira and Lemosho Routes. Continue on through the barren landscape before stopping for lunch. Shortly after lunch, reach the highest point of the day before descending quickly to Barranco Camp. Faster hikers can take a detour via Lava Tower, a 300-foot lava formation jutting out of the mountainside.

Barranco Camp, set among stands of Senecio Kilimanjaro, is considered to be the most scenic campsite on the Machame Route.

Day Four:

Barranco Camp (3,950m/12,960ft) to Karanga Camp (4,600m/15,100ft)

Elevation Gain: 250 meters, 2,120 feet

Distance: 13 Kilometers

Leave Barranco Camp after breakfast for Karanga Valley. The day begins with a 1.5-hour scramble up Barranco Wall. This is the hardest part of the day and in some places, you will have to use your hands to pull your body up. After reaching the top make a short descent into the greener Karanga Valley. We will stop for lunch at Karanga camp on the ridge above the valley for overnight.

Day five:

After breakfast begins the hike to Barafu Camp. On the way to Barafu, view several of Kibo’s glaciers as well as the junction that connects the descent route, Mweka, with the Machame trail. During day four, hike by the Heim, Kersten and Decken Glaciers. Although the trail to Barafu passes through alpine desert with little vegetation, Barafu Camp offers stunning views of Kibo and Mawenzi peaks.

Day Six:

Barafu Camp (4600m to Uhuru Peak (5,895m/19,340ft) to Mweka Camp (3,100m/10,170ft)

Elevation Gain: 1,295 meters, 4,240 feet

Elevation Loss: 2,795 meters, 9,170 feet

Distance: 18 kilometres

After reaching Uhuru and crater, then descend to Mweka. On the way down from Uhuru, enjoy views of the mountain, crater, clouds and glaciers.

At Barafu Camp, eat breakfast and take a short break. You still have another three to five hours to go before reaching Mweka Camp.

 

Day Seven:

Mweka Camp (3,100m/10,170ft) to Mweka Gate (1,500m/4,920ft)

Elevation Loss: 1,600 meters, 5,250 feet

Distance: 10 kilometres

After breakfast, finish the trek with a descent to Mweka Gate. Your last hike on Kilimanjaro is a beautiful one, passing through Kilimanjaro’s cloud forest. Our vehicles will be waiting at the lower station of Mweka Gate to take you back to Moshi.

At Mweka Gate gate you sign your name and details in a register book. This is also where successful climbers receive their summit certificates. Those climbers who reached Stella Point are issued with green certificates and those who reached Uhuru Peak (5895m), receive Golden certificates.

You now drive back to Moshi for a long overdue hot shower, dinner descent bed and celebrations!

 

LEMOSHO ROUTE

7 NIGHTS/8 DAYS

 ITINERARY

Lemosho Route is the longest of the standard routes and is, without doubt, the most beautiful. Expect some of the most extraordinary scenery anywhere in Africa, with well-preserved forests, sweeping moorland, heather forests and high desert. Lemosho Route also offers easy walking days and plenty of opportunity for altitude adjustment.

The route approaches the summit from the west via the Londorossi Gate and one of the most remote quarters of the region. The trailhead is a little more difficult to reach, so Lemosho can sometimes be more expensive options

Day 1: – Londorossi Gate to MtiMkumbwa(2,650 m/8,692 ft)

Hike time: 3hrs

Elevation Change: + 650 M/+2,132

Estimation distance: 10 km

Final Elevation: 2,650 m/8,694 ft

After a 1 1/2 hour drive from Moshi check-in is at the Londorossi Gate. Day 1 is fairly easy with a 3/4 hour climb to MitiMkubwa Camp.

 

Day 2: – MtiMkubwa (2,650 m/8,692 ft) to Shira One Camp (3,609 m/11,841 ft.)

Hike time: 5 – 6 hrs

Elevation change: + 950 M/+3116

Estimation distance: 12 km

Final Elevation: 3609 m/11,841 ft

A few hours walk will see the end of the forest and the beginning of a climb through the heather forest to the edge of the Shira Caldera. The destination is the scenic Shira One Camp

 

Day 3: – Shira One Camp (3,609 m/11,841 ft.) to Shira Two Camp (3,849 m/12,628 ft.)

Hike time: 5 – 6 hrs

Elevation change: + 240 M/+787 ft

Elevation distance: 5 km

Final elevation: 3849 m/12,628 ft.

Today is spent on a gentle hike across the Shira Plateau with possible side trips to Shira Cathedral. The camp is at the first high camp of Shira Two.

NOTE: From Shira Two Camp the trail links with Machame Route.

Day 4: – Shira Two Camp (3,849 m/12,628 ft.) to Barranco Hut (3,948 m/12,956 ft.)

Hike time: 5 hrs

Elevation change: +100 M/+328 ft

Estimated distance: 6 km

Final elevation: 3948 m/12,956 ft.

The real work of climbing Kilimanjaro begins here. Today the main feature is a slow climb to Lava Camp followed by a descent to the beautiful Barranco Camp. This is the Climb-High-Sleep-Low principal of altitude adjustment.

 

Day: 5 – Barranco Hut (3,900 m/12,800 ft) to Karanga Valley (3,963 m/13,000 ft)

Hike time: 3.5 hrs

Elevation change: +100 m/+328 ft

Estimated distance: 4km/2.5 miles

Final elevation: 3,963 m/13,000 ft

After a climb of the Great Barranco Wall, we continue around the southern circuit train until we reach another scenic location of Karanga Camp.

Day 6: – Karanga Valley (3,963 m/13,000 ft) to Barafu Hut (4,600 m/15,091 ft)

Hike time: 3.5 hrs

Elevation change: +600 m/+1,968 ft

Estimated distance: 4km/2.5 miles

Final elevation: 4,600 m/15,091 ft

The trail from Karanga to Barafu reaches the bleak high desert of Kilimanjaro. Barafu Camp is a basic camp geared towards the business of reaching the summit.

 

Day 7:– Barafu Camp (4,600m/15,091 ft) to The Summit (5,896 m/19,343 ft) and then to Mweka Camp (3,100 m/10,170 ft)

Summit time: 7 hrs

Elevation change: +1,300 m/+4,265 ft

Estimated distance: 5km/3.2 miles

Final elevation: 5,896 m/19,343 ft

Descent time: 5 hrs

Elevation change: -2,800 m/-9,186 ft

Estimated distance: 12km/7.5 miles

Final elevation: 3,100 m, 10,170 ft

This is a midnight ‘Alpine Summit’ to make sure we reach the summit by dawn, in time to return to Mweka Camp for the sake of improved

 

Day 8: – Mweka Hut (3,100 m/10,170 ft) to Mweka Gate (1,828 m/6,000 ft)

Descent time: 3hrs

Elevation change: -1,250 m/-4,101 ft

Estimated distance: 10km/6.21

Final elevation: 1,828 m/6,000 ft

Today is a short walk towards Mweka Gate and pickup. It is a short day with arrival at the Gate at about 12:00 noon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact

P.O.Box 10493,

Seth Benjamin street,

Near Aga Khan Hosp. Arusha

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